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Intraoperative hypotension when using hypotension prediction index software during major noncardiac surgery: a European multicentre prospective observational registry (EU HYPROTECT)

October 10, 2023

Background:
Intraoperative hypotension is associated with organ injury. Current intraoperative arterial pressure man- agement is mainly reactive. Predictive haemodynamic monitoring may help clinicians reduce intraoperative hypoten- sion. The Acumen™ Hypotension Prediction Index software (HPI-software) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was developed to predict hypotension. We built up the European multicentre, prospective, observational EU HYPROTECT Registry to describe the incidence, duration, and severity of intraoperative hypotension when using HPI-software monitoring in patients having noncardiac surgery.
Methods:
We enrolled 749 patients having elective major noncardiac surgery in 12 medical centres in five European countries. Patients were monitored using the HPI-software. We quantified hypotension using the time-weighted average MAP <65 mm Hg (primary endpoint), the proportion of patients with at least one 1 min episode of a MAP <65 mm Hg, the number of 1 min episodes of a MAP <65 mm Hg, and duration patients spent below a MAP of 65 mm Hg. Results:
We included 702 patients in the final analysis. The median time-weighted average MAP <65 mm Hg was 0.03 (0.00e0.20) mm Hg. In addition, 285 patients (41%) had no 1 min episode of a MAP <65 mm Hg; 417 patients (59%) had at least one. The median number of 1 min episodes of a MAP <65 mm Hg was 1 (0e3). Patients spent a median of 2 (0e9) min below a MAP of 65 mm Hg. Conclusions:
The median time-weighted average MAP <65 mm Hg was very low in patients in this registry. This suggests that using HPI-software monitoring may help reduce the duration and severity of intraoperative hypotension in patients having noncardiac surgery. Keywords:
artificial intelligence; blood pressure; haemodynamic instability; haemodynamic monitoring; machine learning; postoperative complications